A couple of weeks ago we looked at some data regarding activity in the startup scene. We received some very good feedback, and are posting it here:

On the gut feeling based on QuizUp and that not many startups spun out from there.

Helga:

  • 1. When evaluating the spinoff effects of a company, you have to have a more long-term view. Many of those that go off and create a new company do so when the former company moves out of the “initial” stage into a more “more of the same” stage. Ie. you have to look at people that have left Quizup since the very early days, esp people that were part of the initial team or the first round of hires.2. It is also too early to tell. The initial response for many employees is to seek a “safer” employment after a startup closes up and then after a short or long stint in the security of a larger employer they decide to venture out again.

On the economic upswing:

Hjálmar:

  • The economic upswing is definitely a factor as well. We saw a clear trend in 2004-2008 when hardly a single startup was created as “everyone” could get a well paid and (allegedly) safe job in finance. And while it’s the logical conclusion for each person individually, it’s not good for society collectively.

Egill:

  • I think it’s obvious that the economic upswing affects the entrepreneurial drive – the same happened in 2004-2007. This also applies, I think, to the interest of angel investors in this asset class. It has decreased somewhat, because there is a lot of other investment opportunities available.

On the basic premise of the article:

Salóme:

  • I think one of the reasons for the development you seen in the data is more options. For example, applications to Startup Tourism increased this year. There’s more available for people interested in startups than before: three accelerators, more focus on innovation and entrepreneurship within the universities, and a specific Entrepreneurship Master’s programme at University of Iceland. In general, I think the activity has held steady, in spite of the economic upswing.

Eggert: 

  • Regarding your thoughts on less startup interest, I think you’re right in many ways. However, my hope is that the startups that are active are becoming better, so that in the end its quality, and not quantity, that decide how well we do in this space.

Hrafn:

  • I’m a computer scientist, and up until recently worked at a startup. The company was going well, but not well enough for salary development to follow the cost development in Iceland. At the same time, expenses grew, and the idea of investing in my own real estate became less attainable.
    Therefore, I decided early this year to move, to a well established company that could offer better salaries and benefits. This is a theme I hear from other people.I think the reason behind this is a mix of many things. But when it comes down to it, I think the main reason is less exciting than many others: people just need to be able to pay there bills. While the bills are growing every month, it’s hard to work at bootstrapped startups.