Everyone somewhat involved with startups in Iceland knows of TDF (Technology Development Fund). The fund gives out grants to a lot of companies, and is the lifeline of many in the early stages. While some might argue that angel investments are lacking in Iceland, the TDF definitely takes part in the early stage funding of the Icelandic startup scene.

With recent changes, the fund now offers bigger grants over a shorter period of time. Something that many had been calling for regularly. Last week the fund announced the first recipients of their new, big grant: $600k over two years ($300k per year).

TDF’s announcement:

Sprettur is a major grant, meant to support companies with good opportunity for big growth in the next five years. The companies need to show equity based funding to match the grant.

Obviously, great news for the companies. The one thing I’m puzzled about is the role of TDF in all this. As it is now, TDF and its vetting method (Business plan / excel sheet, who many will tell you is mostly made up) is the gatekeeper for government matching of investment money. Actually, this way the investors are matching the government money.

Now, I’m no expert on government matching programs, but this sounds a bit strange. Most matching programs I’ve heard of – be it Yozma BIRD, or varius angel matching schemes in Singapore, Korea or elsewhere – have the government funding following the investor, not the other way around.

I haven’t found any data on any of this, so I can’t make a judgment, but just based on basic intuition it would make more sense to me that the person making the decision have skin in the game, which is something the TDF definitely doesn’t have.

What do you think of this? Send me a message with your thoughts.